About us

The Pocket Project was founded by Thomas Hübl and Yehudit Sasportas to help induce a shift from trauma-inducing to trauma-informed, trauma sensitive and, finally, trauma-integrating institutions and societies.

We are a non-profit, non-governmental organization and are funded entirely by the generous contributions of financial donors.

The Pocket Project is guided by our values, vision, objectives and key targets and shaped by the emergent needs of our times. We fundraise resources that allow us to contribute to the healing of collective trauma and to reduce its disruptive effects on our global culture. Every donor is an active participant in the realisation of these aims.

Our vision

We restore fragmentation by addressing and integrating individual, ancestral and collective trauma. We heal the wounds from the past, thus shifting humanity towards a path of collaboration, innovation and emergence.

Our Mission

We raise awareness and train civil society and professionals about the global impact and processes for integration of collective trauma. We develop social impact projects that provide trauma-informed service.

Our objectives are to

Inspire

Reach out to a broad audience to inspire awareness of the global impact of collective trauma and open pathways towards integration and healing through social media, festivals and online summits.

Engage

Create opportunities for engagement and collective competence building to both civil society and professionals. Offer scholarships for participants from non-majority backgrounds and the Global South.

Presence

Initiate International Labs that convene geographically and thematically specific groups to address collective trauma as part of a restoration process for respective countries or topics.

REFLECT

Cultivate a coherent system of evaluation and self-reflection throughout our programmes. Partner with experts and research institutes to develop a scientific understanding of Collective Trauma Integration Processes and their effect.

Apply

Offer training and consultancy on trauma-informed leadership and collective trauma integration to civil society, NGOs, SMEs and Aid Organisations. Collaborate with the Academy of Inner Science to train Collective Trauma Facilitators.

INTEGRATE

Set up a Collective Trauma Integration Center for the design and implementation of Collective Trauma Integration Processes for organizations, companies or countries in partnership with leadership circles and governing bodies.

Partner

Cultivate generative international partnerships with like-minded organizations and prepare for consultative status at the UN.

Our theory of change

We cultivate presence, relational sensing and coherence in individuals and groups.

Once a certain level of synchronisation and resourcing is reached, we can turn our attention towards trauma contents which may naturally arise from the group. When trauma is touched, so are our protective layers of self-protection and denial. Our we-spaces need to be resourced and coherent enough to provide a hosting space of witnessing presence for this wave. Then, we can begin to acknowledge and digest what could not be processed before. The ensuing integration and restoration leads to a decrease in isolation and polarisation and increase in compassionate and collaborative ability. Our creative and innovative potential grows.

What is trauma?

Trauma is the inner response within an individual or a collective when facing a situation which is utterly overwhelming.

The high level of stress overloads the capacity for an individual to stay related to the experience. As a result, the nervous system shuts down or disassociates from that part which has become overwhelmed in order to protect the rest of the organism and survive. As this occurs, the symptoms manifest as flight, fight, or freeze response in the body.

Where trauma is not integrated soon after the precipitating event, it remains stored in the nervous system and creates permanent and long-lasting after-effects within a person or, even, a culture. These manifest as a range of symptoms or ‘signposts’ that can be traced back to the original traumatic experiences.

The trauma response is an intelligent function that life developed over millions of years in order to protect the survival of individuals and collectives. As a protective function, it serves life. However, the parts of life or pockets of energy that have been split off can ultimately threaten the wellbeing of the entire system.

In this way, trauma creates internal fragmentation that leads to the manifestation of external fragmentation and ultimately perpetuates itself.

Various forms of trauma have been studied, including:
Attachment trauma

through adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and traumatic attachment processes, children develop defense mechanisms, survival strategies and trauma structures.

Ancestral trauma

trauma incurred by the ancestors of a particular lineage

Transgenerational trauma

when trauma is left unintegrated the effects are passed on to the following generations

Historical trauma

the collective impact of trauma on culture through layers of history

Collective trauma

through large-scale natural or human-made disaster, trauma can be inflicted on entire communities or generations.

Collective trauma is an invisible, yet formative ingredient for the structures that emerge in our cultures and societies, and that we tend to take for granted.

Collective trauma inhibits our potential for the expression of collective intelligence.

The Pocket Project’s contribution to this area of study is multifold: to explore the experiential aspects of both individual and collective trauma, and to illuminate both the overlaps and the distinctions between the two. In interactive training, initiatives, and social impact projects, participants actively investigate these experiences within themselves, with one another, and within their collective fields to ultimately arrive at greater clarity and resolution around the both small and large events that shape their lives.

Collective Trauma Integration

01

Prevention is always the first goal. Once we understand the nature and effects of collective trauma, we can more effectively work together as a global society to prevent the atrocities and systemic disruptions that lead to this phenomenon in the first place.

02

In order to address collective trauma, we need to examine how ancestral, historic and transgenerational trauma intertwine and operate in our unconscious, underlining and forming many of our cultural conceptions.

03

The effects of collective trauma do not just unfold in the immediate aftermath of an event, but potentially continue for a very long timespan. In some cases, the original event is evident, e.g. a natural disaster or war. At other times, the original event may be shrouded in the mists of the past, or rooted in a complex web of decisions and actions, e.g. a failing healthcare system.

04

There is a natural tendency in both individual and collective systems that leans towards healing. When provided with a trauma-informed expertise of heightened attunement and the safety of a well-held, coherent space, trauma will naturally show up for healing.

05

When we are aware of collective trauma as part of our unconscious framework and cultural architecture, this helps us to have the foresight necessary to mitigate collective fear, panic, and resulting behaviors in times of crisis.

It is this background upon which Collective Trauma Integration has been designed.

As Thomas Hübl began to lead retreats in Germany in the early 2000s, he realised that many experiences of participants were rooted in the past, and specifically, related to the Holocaust and World War II. As he continued this work, he brought Germans and Israelis together to process their shared history. Since then, he has worked with tens of thousands of people from more than 40 countries in the facilitation of Collective Trauma Integration Processes. Further explanation can be found in Hübl’s newly released book Healing Collective Trauma: A process for Integrating our Intergenerational and Cultural Wounds.

The goal of a collective trauma integration process is to release and thereby integrate the trauma that is stored both within individuals and within groups of people who share a similar trauma pattern in their collective unconscious. An essential component of this technique is to strengthen the relational coherence of the group. When this happens, the group can release a portion of trauma, and thus, a portion of frozen intelligence of humanity. As we continue this work, together, we create a more open, creative global culture that has the potential for a brighter future.

The collective trauma integration process (CTIP) model has six core stages:

Founders

thomas (1)

Thomas Hübl

Founder

yehudit-pp

Yehudit Sasportas

Founder / Director of Arts

Team

kosha - circle headshot

Kosha Anja Joubert

CEO

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
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Anne Vollborn

Project Manager

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
alexandra

Alexandra Escudero

Care & response coordinator

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
sonita

Sonita Mbah

Social Media Coordinator

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
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HSHU  20120828  Aili Pyhälä on pyörinyt lähes koko elämänsä alkuperäiskansojen parissa ympäri maailmaa, viimeksi baka-kansan parissa Kamerunissa. Antti Tiaisen  juttuun.    Kuva : Juhani Niiranen / HS

Aili Pyhälä 

Scientific Adviser, editor and Project Developer

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
Daria Yemets (1)

Daria Yemets

Ukraine Support Project

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more

Research

Laura (1)

Laura Caldeón de la Barca

Research 2.0

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
kazuma

Kazuma Matoba

Research 2.0

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more

Advisory Board

The Pocket Project Advisory Board is designed as an honorary committee, a visionary source of collaborative inspiration within the Pocket Project – specifically within the field of collective and intergenerational trauma.

Angel

Angel Acosta

PhD

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
Christina

Christina Bethell

PhD

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
joana

Joana Breidenbach

PhD

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
Stephan

Stephan Breidenbach

PhD

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
Scilla

Scilla Elworthy

PhD

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
Robert

Robert Gass

PhD

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
edda

Edda Gottschaldt

PhD

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
Ken Hyatt

Ken Hyatt

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
Christian

Christian W. Mandl

MD, PhD

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
Ruby

Ruby Mendenhall

PhD

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
Aftab

Aftab Omer

PhD

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
Rivka

Rivka Tuval-Mashiach

PhD

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
William

William Ury

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more
Ken Wilber

Ken Wilber

In times of war and existential threat, the feelings of fear, stress,  isolation and fragmentation can become overwhelming. In this call, we offered space for Ukrainian participants of our trauma-informed leadership course to be seen, heard and witnessed by our larger community with the wish that our witnessing may provide sustenance, relatedness and togetherness.
Read more

COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIPS AND NETWORk

At the heart of our partnerships are our close collaboration with Sharing the Presence - GMBH in Germany, Inner Science - LLC in the US and the Academy of Inner Consciousness in Israel.

The Pocket Project cultivates partnerships with like-minded organisations, and those that extend our work into areas beyond our immediate skills and capacities. We are applying for consultancy status at the United Nations and have applied for a booth at the UN COP26 (Climate Conference) in Glasgow later this year.

Global Ecovillage Network

The partnership agreement between the Global Ecovillage Network (GEN) and the Pocket Project was signed in November 2017. GEN restores the capacity of communities to become places of healing and regeneration of life and reaches out to more than 6000 communities on all continents. In partnership with GEN, the Pocket Project offers scholarships to build capacity and skills for trauma integration in crisis areas and fragile democracies.

Institute for Global Integral Competence

In the 21st century, schools and universities have a major responsibility to create spaces in which a cosmopolitan society can be prepared for the future. They can be a place where students can practice ‘global social witnessing (GSW)’ in order to develop human capacities to attend mindfully to global events with embodied awareness. If our future is to be cosmopolitan, we need to establish cosmopolitan education. IfGIC and the Pocket Project have applied for EU funding to co-develop a curriculum for Global Social Witnessing.